Brain Injuries & Concussions

Facts on Brain Type Injuries


Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Concussions

Facts on Brain Type Injuries

A concussion is a traumatic brain injury that alters the way the brain functions.

Concussion Rates – ~8500 per year for collegiate athletes:

Concussion Rates – ~8500 per year for collegiate athletes:

A concussion is a traumatic brain injury that alters the way the brain functions.

The Centers for Disease Control Get the Facts Information Sheet
  • According to 2013 data, 2.8 million emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and deaths occurred in the United States resulted from traumatic brain injury (TBI).
  • 50,000 people died in 2013 as a result of TBI-related injuries.
  • In 2012 alone, 329,290 children in the United States were treated for sports-related injuries that included a diagnosis of concussion or TBI.  The rate of TBI in children as a result of injuries during sports and recreational activities has doubled from 2001 to 2012.
  • Effects are usually temporary, but for some, impairment can last days, weeks, months, or even years after injury.

  • Symptoms may include headache, memory and attention problems, balance problems, depression, and anxiety.

  • A single concussion increases the risk of additional repeat concussions.

  • However, this number is based only on events with a loss of consciousness (LoC) and LoC is seen in only 10-20% of sports-related TBI.

  • Therefore, it is likely that there are more than 1.5 million sports-related concussions each year!

  • Recognition of concussion in athletes is challenging, because many under-report their symptoms.  Better objective diagnostic measures are needed.

  • An estimated 900 sports-related TBI deaths occur each year.

References 

  1. Taylor CA, Bell JM, Breiding MJ, Xu L. Traumatic Brain Injury–Related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths — United States, 2007 and 2013. MMWR Surveill Summ 2017;66(No. SS-9):1–16. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15585/mmwr.ss6609a1
  2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Report to Congress on mild traumatic brain injury in the United States: steps to prevent a serious public health problem. Atlanta (GA): Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2003.
  3. Coronado VG, Haileyesus T, Cheng TA, Bell JM, Haarbauer-Krupa J, Lionbarger MR, Flores-Herrera J, McGuire LC, Gilchrist J. Trends in sports- and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries treated in US emergency departments: The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System-All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP) 2001-2012. J Head Trauma Rehabil 2015; 30 (3): 185–197.
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